Glasgow car bomb attacks

The people charged with the Glasgow car bomb attacks appear in the Old Bailey today.  Now, I’m no criminal lawyer but how can attacks by Scottish residents, carried out in Scotland be tried in England?  On what basis do the Englsh courts have jurisdiction?  Do they not trust a Scottish jury to get the right result, or do they not trust the Scottish prosecution service?  Or perhaps some crucial evidence is based on fingerprints (and recent events indicate this may not be ideal evidence in a Scottish court)?  And why is wee Eck and the SNP government so keen to pick fights on other matters relating to the independence of the Scottish system apparently not bothered, given that the sending of the accused to London was authorised by the government?

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About loveandgarbage

I watch the telly and read when not doing law stuff and plugging my decade and a half old unwatched Edinburgh fringe show.
This entry was posted in glasgow terrorist attacks, law, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Glasgow car bomb attacks

  1. pigeonhed says:

    It would be interesting if the defence used this argument to deny the court’s validity.

  2. giantweazle says:

    Isn’t it traditional? Weren’t the Lockerbie bombers tried in Holland?

  3. Anonymous says:

    I’m no expert on terrorist law, but I rather assume that the Scottish and English prosecutors intend to proceed against all of the accused on some sort of conspiracy charge – if any part of the conspiracy occurred in England then the English courts have jurisdiction to try the ‘scottish’ bombers. In addition, there may be something tucked away in some of the terrorist legislation that gives the courts on both sides of the border concurrent jurisdiction for any terrorist crimes.
    While it would obviously make sense to try a group of conspirators together, the suspicion remains that England pulled rank here – there never seems to have been any question of reversing the process and having the ‘English’ bombers tried in Scotland.

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